Informatics Research Seminar: Using Social Media to Promote Physical Activity

Speaker: Bhibha M. Das, PhD, MPH

Presented from ECU

Broadcast Link: Seminar

Abstract:

Despite the evidence that physical activity and proper nutrition are beneficial to a healthy lifestyle, many individuals struggle with adhering to these behaviors. As technology advances and becomes an ever-present part of today’s society, it is critical to understand how technology can be used to promote healthy lifestyles for chronic disease prevention and management and improvement of quality of life. One such strategy is the use of social media for dissemination of healthy lifestyles. This talk will focus on two interventions, Pirates for HEALTH and Project LIFT-Off, that use social media to promote healthy lifestyles.

Biosketch:

Bhibha M. Das earned a Bachelor’s degree from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, a Masters in Public Health from University of Illinois at Springfield, and a Doctorate in Kinesiology and Community Health from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Bhibha is employed currently at East Carolina University as an Associate Professor in the Department of Kinesiology. Prior to her academic career, Bhibha worked in the field of public health, first at the Illinois Department of Public Health and then at Human Kinetics Publishers, Inc. Dr. Das’ research interests include physical activity promotion for improvements in quality of life in worksites and underserved populations.

Hammond, Duke MMCi featured at HIMSS 2020 Clinical Informatics Workshop

Clinical Research Informatics for the Pharma Industry Workshop

Tuesday, March 10, 2020 | 1:00pm – 5:00pm
Location: Orlando, FL
Additional Registration Required –  More information found here.

Learning Objectives:
  1. Define and understand the domain of clinical research informatics, including its use and application.
  2. Examine the core principles, the value and impact that informatics can have to the Pharma Ecosystem.
  3. Recognize innovative healthcare disruption through the lens of clinical informatics as a positive indicator of progress.
A HIMSS, Duke University, School of Medicine MMCi & Pfizer Collaboration

Program Chairs:

Catherine Diederich, Ed.D., MMCi, Associate Director, Duke University, School of Medicine MMCi

Amy (Nordo) Cramer MMCi, BSN, CPHQ, Clinical Research Informatics, Global Product Development Strategic Partnerships, Pfizer

Christel Anderson, MA Vice President, Informatics, HIMSS

 

Informatics Research Seminar: Validating Wearable Sensors for Digital Biomarker Discovery

Speaker: Brinnae Bent, MS, PhD student

Presented from Duke

Broadcast Link: Seminar

Abstract:

Digital biomarkers are digitally collected data that are transformed into indicators of health outcomes.  As wearable technologies are being increasingly used for digital biomarker discovery, clinical research, and healthcare, it is critical to understand their accuracy and determine how measurement errors may affect research conclusions and impact healthcare decision-making. Accuracy of wearable technologies has been a hotly debated topic in both the research and popular science literature. This seminar will discuss the digital biomarker discovery process and our recent study on validating wearable sensors for clinical use.

Biosketch: 

Brinnae Bent is currently a 4th year PhD Candidate in the BIG IDEAS Lab under Dr. Jessilyn Dunn. Brinnae’s thesis work focuses on learning digital biomarkers from longitudinal wearable sensor data for chronic disease diagnosis and management. She is currently working on mining digital biomarkers for glycemic variability in prediabetic populations using a combination of machine learning and time series methods. To learn more about Brinnae’s work, please go to her website runsdata.org or follow her on Twitter @RunsData.

Informatics Research Seminar: Challenges in Kidney Transplantation where Artificial Intelligence/Machine Learning Could Help

Speaker: William Irish, PhD, MSc.
Presented from ECU

Broadcast Link: Seminar

Abstract:

Kidney transplantation is the preferred treatment for patients with end stage renal disease. Currently, there are over 90,000 patients awaiting a kidney transplant (as of 1/23/2020). On average, 3,000 new patients are added to the kidney waiting list each month.  The median wait time for an individual’s first kidney transplant is approximately 4 years and can vary depending on health, compatibility and availability of organs. Given the success of kidney transplantation, the demand far outweighs the supply.

In 2014 a new kidney allocation system was developed to increase equity in allocation of deceased donor kidneys, for highly sensitized candidates and ethnic minorities, and reduce the number of kidneys recovered but not used (often called the “discard rate”). To accomplish this, the new system prioritizes candidates based on “longevity matching” (better use of available kidneys) as well as sensitivity status and waiting time on dialysis.

Although the new system has improved equity, there are challenges. The models used for allocation of deceased donor organs are based on risk scores and predictions that have low predictive accuracy. Moreover, the discard rate remains high. Further work is needed to explore ways to improve the allocation system. We believe artificial intelligence may help given the complexity of the problem.

The goal of this talk is to present the clinical framework wherein artificial intelligence may provide a better solution.

Biosketch: 

William Irish, PhD MSc, is a Research Professor and Vice Chair for Research in the Department of Surgery and Co-Director of the Big Data & Analytic Research Cluster at East Carolina University, Greenville, NC. Dr. Irish has been involved in health-outcomes and clinical research both in academia and industry for over 25 years; applying various methods to evaluate the effectiveness of health care interventions on clinical and economic outcomes. Dr. Irish has collaborated with investigators internationally, implemented large-scale database analyses and directed analysis/programming teams.  He specializes in outcomes research, clinical trial methodology, statistical modeling and prediction, and large-scale database and claims analyses. His major research interest consists of: (1) identification of important prognostic factors of disease progression and clinical outcomes, including validation of biomarkers; (2) developing statistical models and assessing their clinical utility; and (3) designing randomized controlled trials, specifically in low incidence/rare conditions with specific reference to subject enrichment strategies. Dr. Irish is a member of several professional organizations, including the American Society of Transplantation and the International Society of Pharmacoeconomics and Outcome Research. Dr. Irish is currently Associate Editor for Clinical Transplantation.

Informatics Research Seminar: Natural Language Processing of Medical Guidelines

Speaker: Wlodek Zadrozny, PhD

Presenting University: UNC-Charlotte; Presented from Duke University where Dr. Zadrozny is currently on sabbatical.

Broadcast Link: Seminar

Abstract: 

There are over 30 thousand medical treatments guidelines on PubMed. However, not much is known about the properties of this corpus. For example, we do not know how often and to what degree guidelines (for the same condition) disagree.

This seminar will discuss challenges of building programs extracting information from the text of medical guidelines. A few case studies will be presented, including (1) extraction of condition-action sequences, (2) contradictions and disagreements in guidelines for the same condition. Work shown will include computational architecture for solving some of the underlying technical problems, including a searchable repository currently being built. (This is joint work with H.Hematialam and L.Garbayo, and was partly supported by IBM Faculty Research Grant).

Biosketch:

Wlodek Zadrozny, PhD is a visiting professor with the Duke data science program (MIDS), and Professor of Computer Science at UNC Charlotte. Until 2013 he was a researcher and manager at IBM T.J. Watson Research Lab in Yorktown Heights NY.  Dr. Zadrozny has about 30-years experience in natural language processing, and one of the highlights of his career was the Jeopardy! winning program IBM Watson. His research focuses on computational models of technical text, including text of patents and medical treatment guidelines.

Informatics Research Seminar: The Rise of Global Digital Health, Big Data and Machine Learning

Speaker: David D. Potenziani, PhD, Amy Finnegan, PhD

Presented from UNC-Chapel Hill

Broadcast Link: Seminar (There is content.  Scroll to bottom and click play.)

Abstract: 

IntraHealth International, works in low-and middle-income countries to apply information science and technologies to support national healthcare systems. Currently, Intrahealth is applying machine learning techniques to the big data available to produce information that can support the program teams and the countries they serve. This seminar will provide an overview of the rise of global digital health to support achieving universal health coverage from the evolution of open source tools to advanced applications of machine learning for deeper analysis and answering more profound questions. The first sprint, building a data lake for our program in Uganda and performing hypothesis free and problem driven research and future directions made possible by this early work will be discussed.

Biosketch: 

David D. Potenziani, PhD, is currently Senior Informatics Advisor at IntraHealth International. He has worked in the US, Africa, and Asia with groups to develop and extend the application of digital health technologies and approaches. He swims in an array of ICT domains: mHealth, eLearning, eHealth policy, human resources for health, and machine learning. He came to IntraHealth after two decades at the University of North Carolina, serving in both the schools of Public Health and Medicine. He is a recovering historian and a writer of nerd science fiction.

Amy Finnegan, PhD, is currently Senior Data Scientist at IntraHealth International. She is a demographer and data scientist with 10 years of experience working in global health, development, and data science on four continents. Dr. Finnegan has collected and analyzed primary quantitative and qualitative data on pediatric HIV disclosure, positive parenting, and maternal and newborn survival innovations in East and West Africa. She has led and supported interdisciplinary research teams to design data collection tools and analysis plans and to apply machine learning and other creative research design methods to big, secondary data sets in global health in Uganda, Kenya, and Indonesia on topics such as family planning and maternal mortality. She co-leads Duke’s Big Data for Reproductive Health research team.

Informatics Research Seminar: Introduction to FHIR

Speaker: W. Ed Hammond, PhD.

Presented from Duke

Broadcast Link: Seminar

Abstract:

The HL7® International standard FHIR® is becoming one of the most interesting topics in the healthcare industry.  This presentation will discuss why this interest continues to grow.  FHIR is an enabler of interoperability. First, a detailed description of FHIR will be presented – what it is and what it does. We will then discuss two other related standards, SMART on FHIR (a standard for APIs using FHIR) and CDS Hooks (a standard enabling Clinical Decision Support).  Finally, the presentation will discuss other key activities relating to FHIR and healthcare standard activities including Bulk FHIR, the FHIR Acceleration Program, and new related activities in HL7.

Biosketch: 

Ed Hammond, PhD, is the Director of the Duke Center for Health Informatics, Clinical and Translation Sciences Institute (CTSI).  He is also the Director of the Master of Management in Clinical informatics (MMCi) degree program in the School of Medicine; and the Director for Applied Informatics Research, Duke Health Technology Solutions.  Dr. Hammond serves as a Professor in the Departments of Community and Family Medicine, Biomedical Engineering, Nursing and Fuqua School of Business and is the Chair Emeritus of HL7 International.

Informatics Research Seminar: Ascertaining Death and Hospitalization Endpoints– The TRANSFORM-HF Experience

Speaker: Eric Eisenstein, DBA
Presented from Duke

Broadcast Link: Seminar

At Duke, all seminars live or broadcast will be held in Hock Auditorium from 4-5 pm.

Abstract:

Pragmatic clinical trials frequently rely upon information collected for other purposes (e.g., patient reported outcomes, health records and medical claims). This presentation will review and evaluate the different data sources that are available for ascertaining death and hospitalization endpoints in clinical research studies. Typically, a single data source is insufficient for obtaining complete death and hospitalization information. This leads to the creation of hybrid data collection strategies. TRANSFORM-HF’s death and hospitalization endpoint identification and validation procedures will be reviewed as an example of how multiple data collection methods can be used to obtain more complete data coverage in a pragmatic clinical trial.

Biosketch:

Dr. Eisenstein’s primary research interest is the use of information technologies to simplify clinical trial operations and reduce research costs. This has included the evaluation of four population-based studies that used asynchronous decision support to improve care coordination for Medicaid patients. He is also involved with several efforts to evaluate the feasibility of eSource (direct data capture from site electronic health records to clinical trial databases). Currently, he is Data Coordinating Center Co-PI for the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute sponsored TRANSFORM-HF clinical trial. This 6000 patient heart failure pragmatic trial is using novel information technology strategies to simplify clinical trial design, improve operations and reduce costs.

Informatics Research Seminar: From Bench to Bedside – Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) and Pain

Speaker: John J. Sollers, PhD
Presented from NCCU

Broadcast Link: Seminar

At Duke, all seminars live or broadcast will be held in Hock Auditorium from 4-5 pm.

Abstract:

Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) is the most common genetic disorder of blood characterized by frequent & debilitating acute pain crises and chronic persistent pain. There is increased research interest on the interaction between biological, cognitive, and affective factors influencing onset, maintenance & resolution of chronic pains associated with SCD (Edwards et al., 2005).  This talk with explore a promising treatment — Hydroxyurea (HU), fear of movement (kinesiophobia), and premenstrual syndrome (PMS) as they relate to our clinical and scientific understandings of this multifaceted disorder.  How this all fits into the Bio-Psych-Social Model, and our wider understanding of disease and treatment will be  discussed.

Biosketch:

John J. Sollers III, Ph.D, is an internationally known expert on heart rate variability (HRV) and health and has authored or co-authored over 80 peer-reviewed journal articles.  He received his M.A. (1995) and Ph.D.(1997) in Experimental; Psychology from the University of Missouri-Columbia. Dr. Sollers was a Staff Scientist with the National Institute of Aging, NIH, an Asst. Research Professor at The Ohio State University, and Senior Lecturer (US equivalent of Tenured Associate Professor) at the University of Auckland Medical School (Auckland, New Zealand) before joining the faculty at NCCU.