Informatics Research Seminar: Ascertaining Death and Hospitalization Endpoints– The TRANSFORM-HF Experience

Speaker: Eric Eisenstein, DBA
Presented from Duke

Broadcast Link: Seminar

At Duke, all seminars live or broadcast will be held in Hock Auditorium from 4-5 pm.

Abstract:

Pragmatic clinical trials frequently rely upon information collected for other purposes (e.g., patient reported outcomes, health records and medical claims). This presentation will review and evaluate the different data sources that are available for ascertaining death and hospitalization endpoints in clinical research studies. Typically, a single data source is insufficient for obtaining complete death and hospitalization information. This leads to the creation of hybrid data collection strategies. TRANSFORM-HF’s death and hospitalization endpoint identification and validation procedures will be reviewed as an example of how multiple data collection methods can be used to obtain more complete data coverage in a pragmatic clinical trial.

Biosketch:

Dr. Eisenstein’s primary research interest is the use of information technologies to simplify clinical trial operations and reduce research costs. This has included the evaluation of four population-based studies that used asynchronous decision support to improve care coordination for Medicaid patients. He is also involved with several efforts to evaluate the feasibility of eSource (direct data capture from site electronic health records to clinical trial databases). Currently, he is Data Coordinating Center Co-PI for the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute sponsored TRANSFORM-HF clinical trial. This 6000 patient heart failure pragmatic trial is using novel information technology strategies to simplify clinical trial design, improve operations and reduce costs.

Informatics Research Seminar: From Bench to Bedside – Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) and Pain

Speaker: John J. Sollers, PhD
Presented from NCCU

Broadcast Link: Seminar

At Duke, all seminars live or broadcast will be held in Hock Auditorium from 4-5 pm.

Abstract:

Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) is the most common genetic disorder of blood characterized by frequent & debilitating acute pain crises and chronic persistent pain. There is increased research interest on the interaction between biological, cognitive, and affective factors influencing onset, maintenance & resolution of chronic pains associated with SCD (Edwards et al., 2005).  This talk with explore a promising treatment — Hydroxyurea (HU), fear of movement (kinesiophobia), and premenstrual syndrome (PMS) as they relate to our clinical and scientific understandings of this multifaceted disorder.  How this all fits into the Bio-Psych-Social Model, and our wider understanding of disease and treatment will be  discussed.

Biosketch:

John J. Sollers III, Ph.D, is an internationally known expert on heart rate variability (HRV) and health and has authored or co-authored over 80 peer-reviewed journal articles.  He received his M.A. (1995) and Ph.D.(1997) in Experimental; Psychology from the University of Missouri-Columbia. Dr. Sollers was a Staff Scientist with the National Institute of Aging, NIH, an Asst. Research Professor at The Ohio State University, and Senior Lecturer (US equivalent of Tenured Associate Professor) at the University of Auckland Medical School (Auckland, New Zealand) before joining the faculty at NCCU.

Informatics Research Seminar: Geofencing- A Potential Catalyst to Audience Engagement in Health Communication

Speaker: Mary Tucker-McLaughlin, PhD
Presented from ECU

Broadcast Link: Seminar

At Duke, all seminars live or broadcast will be held in Hock Auditorium from 4-5 pm.

Abstract:

Health communication professionals face numerous challenges in reaching marginalized and transient populations. Mobile technology, geofencing in particular, offers the potential to reach populations that are not easily accessible through traditional communication channels or social media. This seminar presents data from three separate studies that utilized geofencing and mobile display technology to reach these audiences. The first study applies the technology to beach safety along the North Carolina coast, the second to dental resource awareness in a population of Native Americans, and the third to mental health resources for migrant farm workers in Eastern North Carolina.  Research design, results and technology pros and cons will be discussed.

Biosketch:

Dr. Mary Tucker-McLaughlin is an Associate Professor and the Undergraduate Coordinator for the ECU School of Communication. She holds a PhD in Mass Communication from the University of South Carolina. Her current research focuses on the use of technology in the dissemination of public health messages. She has served as an investigator on both internal and external grants including a Robert Wood Johnson grant for $250,000. Her research has been published in public health, health promotion, and mass communication journals. She is a former television news journalist and public relations professional who has also served as a consultant for both manufacturing and health organizations in Eastern North Carolina.

Informatics Research Seminar: Clinical Data Quality for Secondary Use in the Learning Healthcare System

Speaker: Franck Diaz, PhD
Presented from UNC-C

Broadcast Link: Seminar

At Duke, all seminars live or broadcast will be held in Hock Auditorium from 4-5 pm.

Abstract:

Electronic Health Record data is a fundamental to the development of learning healthcare systems, yet they present severe limitations for their reliable secondary analysis. Though clinical data often presents a high enough quality level for patient care and billing, their quality is often questioned for research applications. For example, clinical data are often found to contain inaccurate values, incomplete records, inaccessible information within clinical notes or just be recorded at an unusable level of granularity for specific analyses (e.g., yearly glucose level readings for research questions involving investigating daily changes). This seminar will describe some of these data quality limitations, introduce DataGauge: a practical process for systematically designing and implementing quality assessments of re-purposed clinical data, present data showing the impact of clinical workflows on the quality of clinical data sets and discuss the heterogeneity of such workflows that complicates the secondary use of clinical data.

Biosketch:

Franck Diaz, PhD is an Assistant Professor of Health Analytics and Informatics at the Department of Public Health Science in the College of Health and Human Sciences at University of North Carolina at Charlotte (UNCC). He joined UNCC in August of 2019 after completing a K-12 PRIME fellowship program for the National Institute for General Medical Science at Wake Forest School of Medicine and being part of WakeHealth’s Clinical and Translational Science Institute. His research focuses on developing methods for the reliable reuse of clinical data and carrying out secondary analyses to uncover modes of failure in clinical data sets. Dr. Diaz holds a PhD in Health Informatics from the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston’s School of Biomedical informatics. He also holds a specialized Biomedical Engineering degree from Polytech’Marseille in France.

Informatics Research Seminar: Emerging Interoperability Initiatives in Diagnostic Pathology

Speaker: Rajesh Dash, MD
Presented from Duke

Broadcast Link: Seminar

At Duke, all seminars live or broadcast will be held in Hock Auditorium from 4-5 pm.

Abstract:

Molecular Pathology and Digital Pathology represent two related disciplines of diagnostic medicine that are rapidly evolving due to advancement of technology.  Data, infrastructure, and communication standards along with emerging interoperability initiatives serve to help accelerate creation of robust, scalable solutions for advancing patient care within healthcare organizations.  This seminar will examine recently proposed models for information management covering both molecular data and tissue based imaging.

 

Biosketch:

Dr. Dash is a board-certified pathologist with fellowship training in Cytopathology and Informatics.  He currently serves as the Beaker physician champion and Director for Laboratory Informatics Strategy, reporting to the office of the Chief Health Information Officer for Duke Health.  He has an undergraduate degree in computer science and specializes in medical informatics, fine needle aspiration cytology and surgical pathology of breast cancer.  Dr. Dash is involved in the research and development of medical terminologies and associated software tools for medical data mining and analysis. He is the principal author of Duke’s primary biorepository informatics platform managing samples and associated clinical data, called MAW3®, which has been in development since 1998, has served in a production environment since 2000.  Dr. Dash is active on a number of national and international committees, including serving as a Co-Chair of the Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise (IHE) Pathology and Laboratory Medicine (PaLM) Domain, and serving the College of American Pathologists on their Informatics Committee, Information Technology Leadership Committee, CAP Foundation Board, and the Board of Governors.

Informatics Research Seminar: Data Challenges with Real-Time Safety Event Detection & Clinical Decision Support

Speaker: Eric Kirkendall, MD
Presented from Wake Forest

Broadcast Link: Seminar

At Duke, all seminars live or broadcast will be held in Hock Auditorium from 4-5 pm.

Abstract:

The Decision Support Analytics Workgroup (DSAW) at Cinncinati Children’s Hospital Medical Center (CCHMC) was founded by Dr. Eric Kirkendall. The collaborative continues to investigate the links between the effectiveness of clinical decision support (CDS), patient safety, and user efficiency. Many of the research projects have also incorporated artificial intelligence techniques (e.g., natural language processing) and other innovative methods to detect adverse events/harm across multiple hospital environments. The results have shown vast improvements in detecting and mitigating errors compared to traditional methods. This seminar will focus on how Decision Support Analytics and Healthcare Innovation are utilized to solve problems such as data challenges and real-time safety event detection when being used as part of clinical decision support.

Biosketch:

Dr. Eric Kirkendall is a pediatrician that uses health information technology to maximize patient safety and quality in clinical care delivery, data management, and novel application/software development. He is the former Associate Chief Medical Information Officer in Cincinnati Children’s, overseeing the design, implementation, and optimization of the electronic health record and other associated technologies. Dr. Kirkendall was recruited to Wake Forest Baptist Health, to help lead NNGN™ (“engine”) – the Wake Forest Center for Healthcare Innovation. In that role Eric utilizes informatics tools and technologies to accomplish NNGN’s mission of rapidly translating innovation and discoveries into our clinical enterprise, promoting increased care quality, safety, and cost-effectiveness.

 

Informatics Research Seminar: From the Bedside to Home- Applying Informatics Methods to Improve Health Outcomes

Speaker: Saif Khairat, PhD, FAMIA
Presented from UNC-CH

Broadcast Link: Seminar (There is content, click play button on bottom left).

 

Abstract:

Major healthcare challenges include information overload and accessibility to adequate care. In the EHR era, we face large, complex data that demand time-sensitive decisions by providers. The challenge of finding information in the EHR results in poor patient outcomes, provider dissatisfaction, and increased healthcare-related costs. By improving EHR interface designs, providers can navigate the EHR more efficiently and effectively. On the other hand, the growing demands for healthcare combined with shortage in providers create a difficulty in providing care, especially for patients in rural areas. Telemedicine, the interaction between providers and patients remotely through information technologies, provides a promising solution to improve access. This talk discusses the impact of innovative informatics methods to improve Provider-EHR relationship, and to improve health equity and bridge health disparities.

Biosketch:

With over a decade of experiences, Dr. Saif Khairat, PhD, FAMIA has lead national and international projects to enhance healthcare services and research, specifically within the informatics world. His research agenda comprises two main areas: (1) health IT usability and visualization, (2) telemedicine in health services research. He is site PI of the NIH funded project titled “Overcoming the Barriers to Clinical Trial Recruitment through Teleconsent”. Dr. Khairat was Co-Principal Investigator of the Great Plains Telehealth Resource and Assistance Center, funded by Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), a three-year federally funded center that is responsible for increasing Telehealth awareness and providing consultation to healthcare providers and vendors in six states.

Informatics Research Seminar: Applications of Predictive Computer Modeling and Data Analytics in Precision Medicine

Speaker: Ali Vahdati, PhD
Presented from ECU

Broadcast Link: Seminar (There is content, click play button on bottom left)

Abstract:

Organs, tissues and cells of the human body experience multi-directional and complex mechanical loads in their natural environment. Consequently, mechanical forces play an important role in pathogenesis of many connective tissue diseases and in the outcome of various surgeries. This talk will cover how
computational modeling and experimental techniques can be utilized to better understand the interaction of both native tissue and implants with their mechanical environment. Furthermore, examples will be presented from past and present research dealing with predictive modeling of connective tissue pathologies and surgical outcomes with the overarching goal of making various surgical techniques safer and more effective.

Biosketch:

Dr. Vahdati is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Engineering atEast Carolina University. His research is focused in the areas of multi-physics computational modeling and multi-scale biomechanical testing of natural and synthetic biomaterials for applications in precision medicine. He utilizes computer
modeling (virtual experiments) and experimental techniques to study the interaction of implants with native tissue, to predict the outcome of subject-specific surgical techniques and to prevent and diagnose mechanically-induced pathologies of soft and calcified tissues. Dr. Vahdati joined ECU after working for a Fortune 500 medical device company and the Cleveland Clinic, Ohio.