Short Course for Inter-American Development Bank

July 30 through August 1, DCHI provided a Short Course for 24 employees of the Inter-American Development Bank, the main source of multilateral financing in Latin America. They provide solutions to development challenges and support in the key areas of the region.  Fourteen countries in the Caribbean and Latin America were represented.  The purpose of the course was to give participants a broad overview of the history of healthcare, current trends and the process of converting from paper to electronic health systems.

Duke particpants included: Iain Sanderson, BM, BCh (Director, Biomedical Informatics Core); Rachel Richesson, PhD (Associate Professor, Duke School of Nursing); Eric Eisenstein, DBP (Associate Professor, Duke School of Medicine); Genie McPeek-Hinz, MD (Associate Chief Health Information Officer, Duke University Health System); Eric Poon, MD (Chief Health Information Officer, Duke Medicine); Jimmy Tcheng, MD (Chief Medical Information Officer, Duke Heart Network); Ed Hammond, PhD (Director, Duke Center for Health Informatics; and Vivian West, PhD (Associate Director, Duke Center for Health Informatics).  The  Short Course was held at JB Duke Hotel and Conference Center in Durham, NC.

Hammond is Keynote speaker at The International Healthcare Interoperability Conference

IHIC 2018

Mastering the Interoperability Challenge

July 11-12 in Portsmouth, UK

 

W. Ed Hammond, PhD is a Keynote Speaker at IHIC 2018 and will discuss “How do you know when you have Interoperability?”.

The IHIC is a forum for informatics practitioners  and scientists to present and discuss concepts, models and implementations for innovative interoperable e-Health solutions. The conference provides an opportunity to share experiences and best practices towards the goal of interoperability across health domains. Scientific papers, demonstrations, and practice reports are presented.

Hammond invited by HL7 Brazil to speak during the On-line International Seminars on Health Information Technologies and Standards Conference

On June 14, 2018, the Health Level 7 International office in Brazil held their fifth online conference of seminars related to the adoption of standards and their role in the use of health information systems.  The next step is to ensure the interoperability of standards across all environments to ensure the survival of health information systems.   W. Ed Hammond, PhD, Director of the Duke Center for Health Informatics presented Advances and Perspectives in Health Information Standards to outline the future of the field.

 

Tennenbaum serving on the Board of Scientific Counselors (BoSC) for the Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical Communications

Jessica Tennenbaum, PhD has been appointed to a multi-year term on the Boards of Scientific Counselors (BSCs).  BSCs  were established in 1956 “to advise the Scientific Directors (SDs) on the quality of the intramural research programs for which they are responsible.”  BSCs are composed of “individuals who have outstanding scientific credentials and who are committed to providing rigorous, objective reviews. Although the principal purpose of these independent evaluations is to advise the SDs, the reports of the BSCs are distributed to the Director, National Institutes of Health, the Deputy Director for Intramural Research, and the appropriate Institute or Center (IC) Director.”  The Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical Communications is one of two intramural Centers within the National Library of Medicine.

Richesson Appointed DCHI Associate Director of Research

Rachel Richesson, PhD, Associate Professor, Duke University School of Nursing, has been appointed Associate Director of Research at the Duke Center for Health Informatics (DCHI). She has a PhD and MS in Health Informatics and an MPH in Community Health Practice from the University of Texas.. She is a Fellow of the American College of Medical Informatics. She edited the first and only textbook on the topic of Clinical Research Informatics, published in 2012 (Springer). Director of the DCHI Ed Hammond, PhD, expressed his enthusiasm about Dr. Richesson joining the leadership  of DCHI: “We are so excited to include her as part of our leadership team, her expertise in informatics will be invaluable as we strive to promote research in the field .”

Dr. Richesson lectures on various topics related to data standards and interoperability for a number of programs at Duke. During her extensive research career, she has directed the identification and implementation of data standards for multi-national multi-site clinical research and epidemiological studies, including the NIH Rare Diseases Clinical Research Network (RDCRN), Type 1 Diabetes TrialNet, and The Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young (TEDDY) study.  She also helped to design and implement the RDCRN Contact Registry for over 150 rare diseases and supports various patient and disease advocacy organizations to develop patient registries for a number of other conditions.  Dr. Richesson served as co-chair the RDCRN Standards and Registry Committees, and has interacted with a number standards development organizations to represent the clinical research perspective. As part of her original informatics research, she has implemented and evaluated specific standardized coding systems (e.g., SNOMED CT, RxNorm and NDF-RT) in research settings and explored the coverage of these coding systems for various research projects. Further, she works with a number of multi-disciplinary teams to demonstrate how these and other data standards can be used to facilitate the analysis of large data sets to answer important population health questions.

Dr. Richesson currently leads the Phenotype & Data Quality Core for the NIH Health Systems Research Collaboratory, which is developing standards and quality metrics for clinical phenotyping using EHR data in pragmatic clinical trials. As part of the PCORnet Coordinating Center, she participated in developing and promoting standardized approaches for cohort identification using EHRs, including the development of “gold standard” definitions and measuring the predictive value of EHR query algorithms. She also co-led the PCORnet Rare Diseases Task Force with Dr. Priya Kishnani (Duke School of Medicine).

Dr. Richesson is the PI of NLM-funded research to develop a decision support readiness assessment model using specific data requirements for a number of clinical guidelines recommended for emergency medicine, and a co-investigator on a study aiming to improve patient outcomes for individuals with sickle cell diseases that includes the use of a national registry. She has served on a number of leadership roles at the American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA), including the Publications Task Force and the Clinical Research Informatics Working Group. She was Chair of the Scientific Program Committee for the 2014 Clinical Research Informatics Summit, and is on the planning committee for the 2016 AMIA Policy Invitational Summit and the American College of Informatics annual meeting in 2017. Currently, Dr. Richesson is co-chair of the AMIA HIT Standards Advisory Group with Dr. Christopher Chute (Johns Hopkins University).

In her role as Associate Director of Research for DCHI, Dr. Richesson will help promote biomedical informatics research at Duke by collaborating with DCHI on its interdisciplinary approach for education and research designed to bring together informaticians, physicians, nurses, and health care administrators with expertise in aggregation, analysis, and use of informatics to improve human health.

NEW Master’s (MS) Degree in Interdisciplinary Data Science (MIDS)

The Duke University Board of Trustees has approved a new MS Degree in Interdisciplinary Data Science for the Fall 2018.  Co-hosted by the Information Initiative at Duke (iiD) and the Social Science Research Institute (SSRI), the program will be train students from a variety of disciplines to be data scientists who are proficient in the management, security and communications of data as well as team-based sciences.  For more information, visit the Duke Today article.

Hammond Honored with Endowed Chair

“Building Bridges” is an apt term to describe the gift William Stead, MD and his wife, Janet, have recently made to endow a professorship at the Duke University School of Medicine to honor W. Ed Hammond, PhD, Professor of Community and Family Medicine and Director of the Duke Center for Health Informatics. The endowment is focused on “advancing knowledge by bridging disciplines.”  Dr. Stead, the chief strategy officer at Vanderbilt University Medical Center and a former Durham native, Duke Alumni and physician has been a colleague and friend of Dr. Hammond for forty years.  Together Drs. Hammond and Stead were integral in the creation of the field we now know of as Biomedical Informatics.

Tenenbaum Selected as New Fellow of American College of Medical Informatics

staff with the Duke Translational Research Institute pose for a group photo and some individual portraits

Jessica Tenenbaum, PhD(link is external),  Assistant Professor of Biostatistics & Bioinformatics, will be inducted into the American College of Medical Informatics on Nov. 13, 2016. She is one of 23 new fellows elected by peers this year.

ACMI is a professional society of elected Fellows from the United States and abroad who have made significant and sustained contributions to the field of medical informatics and who have met rigorous scholarly scrutiny by their peers. Incorporated in 1984, ACMI dissolved its separate corporate status to merge with the American Association for Medical Systems and Informatics (AAMSI) and the Symposium on Computer Applications in Medical Care (SCAMC) when AMIA was formed in 1989. The College now exists as an entity within AMIA, with its own bylaws and regulations.

The College originated in 1984 when five pioneers in informatics, including Ed Hammond, MD, director of the Duke Center for Informatics, decided to establish an honorific society to recognize expertise in biomedical Informatics. Today, there are nearly 300 Fellows.