Informatics Research Seminar: Patient-Centered Health Records and Exchange via Blockchain

Speakers: Ray Hylock, PhD
Presented from ECU

At Duke, live seminars will be held in Hock Auditorium from 4-5 pm.

Abstract:

The world is abuzz with blockchain – the secure, distributed ledger made famous by Bitcoin. Daily, we read of yet another startup or how an organization is seeking to integrate the technology into its infrastructure. While blockchain has been actively deployed in the financial sector for many years, its disruptive nature has only recently become apparent. As a result, researchers and technologists from virtually every domain have sought to implement blockchain. While healthcare is not an exception, the very essence of health data along with questions regarding blockchain’s role in delivering quality care, have erected barriers to its realization in practice. In this presentation, we will explain the basics of blockchain, discuss its benefits in healthcare (from the patient’s perspective), submit a patient-centered framework, propose solutions to several confounding problems, and present a proof-of-concept prototype named HealthChain.

Biosketch:

Ray Hylock, PhD, is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Health Services and Information Management at East Carolina University. He received his BS in Business Administration with an emphasis in High Technology Management from California State University, San Marcos, and MS and PhD in Informatics with an emphasis in Health Informatics from the University of Iowa. His research primarily focuses on computation advancements to support patient care in the areas of health care databases/data warehouses, federation, advanced data structures, optimization, and heuristics.

Richesson to teach AMIA/DCHI 10X10 Distance Learning Course

The Duke Center for Health Informatics and Rachel Richesson, an associate professor in the Duke School of Nursing and noted informaticist, will be teaching an online course, Data Standards for Learning Health Systems, for 10 weeks, starting on September 17, 2018.

The course is part of the American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA) 10×10 Virtual Courses program.  A key part of this program is offering curricular content from existing informatics training programs through online, virtual classes.

The course will explore the concept of learning health systems and closely examine the specific data standards required to support the data exchange and re-use in this context. Students will have an opportunity to define a clinical question and the various standards that can support the application and evaluation of evidence in a health care setting.

Visit the AMIA website for more information, including cost and online registration

Informatics Research Seminar: The Future of Health and Getting There

Speaker: Ed Hammond, PhD,
Presented from Duke

Abstract: 

Almost anything and everything that relates to healthcare is changing. Many of these changes relate to new and developing technologies; to data sharing across sites of care; to new methods for reimbursement; to new roles for the stakeholders involved in the delivery of health care; to the delivery of care in new settings; to changing and aging populations; and to shifts in responsibilities.  Computers and robots will replace humans for many of the tasks now done by humans including decision making.  New types of data will become a key part of decision making – behavioral, genomic, social, and environmental will be added to clinical data. Patients will play an increasingly important role in taking responsibility of their own health and decision-making. New ways of using and viewing data are essential for the volume of data.  Patient Reported Outcomes will become a primary source of data.  Precision Medicine will focus on individuals. Population Health will engage all sectors of the world around us – individuals, families, neighborhoods, communities, regions, countries, and the global society.

Biosketch:

Ed Hammond, PhD, is the Director of the Duke Center for Health Informatics, Clinical and Translation Sciences Institute (CTSI).  He is also the Director of Academic Affairs for the Master of Management in Clinical informatics (MMCi) degree program in the School of Medicine; and the Director for Applied Informatics Research, Duke Health Technology Solutions. Ed is the Chair Emeritus of HL7 International.

Informatics Research Seminar: Development of Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) Care Application

Speaker: Andrew Wang, MD
Presented from Duke University

Broadcast Link: Seminar

At Duke, all seminars live or broadcast will be held in Hock Auditorium from 4-5 pm.

Abstract:
The presentation will review the development of HCM Care, a website and application to improve patients’ understanding of a specific cardiovascular condition, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM).

Biosketch:
Dr. Andrew Wang is a Professor of Medicine in the Division of Cardiology at Duke University Medical Center.  His clinical research and work have focused on patients with structural heart diseases, including valvular heart disease, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and infective endocarditis.  He is involved in multicenter registries and trials to evaluate novel therapies in these conditions.  He has directed the Duke Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Clinic since 2003.  In addition, he is the program director for the Cardiovascular Disease fellowship program.

The Informatics Research Seminar Series is sponsored by Duke University and a collaboration with UNC-Chapel Hill, NCCU, UNC-Charlotte, and ECU. This series explores key areas in Health Informatics and include research results, overview of programs of research, basic, applied, and evaluative projects, as well as research from varied epistemological stances.

Informatics Research Seminar: Advanced Analytics Adoption at UNC Health Care System: A Case Study

Speaker: Polly Mitchell-Guthrie, MBA

Presented from UNC-CH

Broadcast Link: Seminar

At Duke, all seminars live or broadcast will be held in Hock Auditorium from 4-5 pm.

Abstract:

UNC Health Care is one of the state’s leading and most innovative healthcare organizations, providing a full spectrum of health and wellness programs at hundreds of care locations across the state.  Enterprise Analytics and Data Sciences (EADS) is a new department at UNC using an innovative operating model and new technologies to create a place where our world-class care can be driven by insights gained through our enhanced capabilities of data and analytics. This session will demonstrate how a large healthcare system realized a vision for becoming a data-driven organization by adopting advanced analytics as a strategic imperative to support value-based healthcare.  A case study will be presented to illustrate.

Biosketch:

Polly Mitchell-Guthrie, MBA is the System Director of Analytical Consulting Services within Enterprise Analytics and Data Sciences at the University of North Carolina Health Care System. Previously she was Senior Manager of the Advanced Analytics Customer Liaison Group in SAS’ Research and Development Division, where her team served as a bridge between R&D and external customers and internal SAS divisions. Before that she was Director of the SAS Global Academic Program, leading SAS’ outreach to colleges and universities worldwide to incorporate SAS into their teaching. Polly began her career at SAS in Strategic Investments and later served in Alliances, after working in the nonprofit sector in philanthropy and social services. She has an MBA from the Kenan-Flagler Business School of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where she also received her BA in Political Science as a Morehead Scholar. She has held several leadership positions within INFORMS, a professional association, serving as the Chair and Vice Chair of the Analytics Certification Board and Secretary of the Analytics Society.

 

The Informatics Research Seminar Series is sponsored by Duke University and a collaboration with UNC-Chapel Hill, NCCU, UNC-Charlotte, and ECU. This series explores key areas in Health Informatics and include research results, overview of programs of research, basic, applied, and evaluative projects, as well as research from varied epistemological stances.

Informatics Research Seminar: Weighing the Odds — Problem List Omissions and Patient Portal Utility among Obese Patients

Speaker: Juhee Kim, ScD & Akshat Kapoor, PhD
Presented from ECU

Broadcast Link: Seminar

At Duke, all seminars live or broadcast will be held in Hock Auditorium from 4-5 pm.

Abstract:
There is a great need for the long-term maintenance of a healthy body weight in health care setting. The WHO BMI cut points for weight status have been adopted by clinical guidelines as a strategy to aid decision making in clinical practice. Despite the promising potential in patient engagement and chronic disease management among portal users, it is unknown whether the obesity classification may influence patient portal use as a means of provider and patient communication and patient engagement.  We examine patient portal use to identify any association with obesity classification. Furthermore, obesity is a continuing national epidemic and the condition can have physical, psychological as well as a social impact on one’s well-being. Consequently, it is critical to accurately diagnose and document obesity in an electronic medical record (EMR), so that the information can be used and shared to improve clinical decision making and health communication via patient portal use, and in turn, the patient’s prognosis. It is therefore worthwhile to identify the various factors that play a role in documenting obesity diagnoses and methods to improve current documentation practices and consumer health informatics.

Biosketch:
Juhee Kim, ScD, is an associate professor in the Department of Public Health at East Carolina University.  As a nutritional and MCH epidemiologist, she has extended research experience at community and clinical settings. She established a clinic-based research program, Patient Engagement and Consumer Health Informatics (PEACHI), at ECU Physicians Clinics.  Her research aims to understand patients’ needs and modifiable health behaviors to improve health care services and outcomes to improve health disparities.

Akshat Kapoor, PhD, is an assistant professor in the Department of Health Services and Information Management at East Carolina University. Prior to earning his PhD in Biomedical and Health Informatics from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, he received an M.S. in Bioinformatics from Marquette University, His research focuses on improving patient engagement and patient-provider communication via use of innovative technologies, such as apps, social media, and interactive educational resources, to aid patients in the self-management of their medical conditions. His research emphasizes how healthcare organizations can innovate and effectively engage patients and communities in playing an active role in their own health.

 

The Informatics Research Seminar Series is sponsored by Duke University and a collaboration with UNC-Chapel Hill, NCCU, UNC-Charlotte, and ECU. This series explores key areas in Health Informatics and include research results, overview of programs of research, basic, applied, and evaluative projects, as well as research from varied epistemological stances.

Informatics Research Seminar: Using EMR Data for Clinical Research– Experience and Practical Implications

Speaker: Alexander Turchin, MD, MS
Presented from Duke University

Broadcast Link: Seminar

At Duke, all seminars live or broadcast will be held in Hock Auditorium from 4-5 pm.

Abstract:
Electronic medical records (EMR) represent a rich source of clinical data that can be utilized for research, quality assurance, and pay-for-performance, among others. However, it is important to recognize that, like any other data source, EMR data has its own pitfalls that need to be approached in a rigorous fashion. In particular, a large fraction of data in EMR is “locked” in narrative documents and can therefore be especially challenging to extract. This presentation will discuss issues users can expect to encounter when analyzing EMR data and how they can be approached. The presentation will specifically focus on using natural language processing to extract data from narrative electronic documents, using publicly available NLP platform Canary (http://canary.bwh.harvard.edu) as an example. The discussion will be illustrated by specific instances of clinical research using EMR data, including narrative text.

Biosketch:
Alexander Turchin, MD, MS is Director of Clinical Informatics at Baim Institute for Clinical Research, Director of Informatics Research at the Division of Endocrinology at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Associate Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Turchin is a graduate of Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (Medical Informatics). His research focuses on analysis of electronic medical record data; he uses advanced informatics technologies including natural language processing to study quality of care and outcomes in chronic endocrine diseases. Dr. Turchin is a Fellow of the American College of Medical Informatics and has published over 80 papers and book chapters; his research has been funded by AHRQ, NIH and private foundations.

The Informatics Research Seminar Series is sponsored by Duke University and a collaboration with UNC-Chapel Hill, NCCU, UNC-Charlotte, and ECU. This series explores key areas in Health Informatics and include research results, overview of programs of research, basic, applied, and evaluative projects, as well as research from varied epistemological stances.