Informatics Research Seminar: A Kaleidoscope of Usability Studies on Health Informatics Tools and Applications

Moderator: Deborah E. Swain, PhD
Presented from NCCU

Broadcast Link: Seminar

Abstract: 

Since 2014, graduate students in the Masters of Information Science (MIS) degree program at NCCU have been testing the usability of tools, apps, and expert systems designed to enhance access to relevant information about improving healthcare. As research adviser, Dr. Deborah Swain, Ph.D., in the School of Library and Information Sciences (SLIS), has prepared students and guided research on UX (user experience).  The presentation will provide a “kaleidoscope” review of the research, including award-winning poster presentations, which include studies of a knowledge-based system that described migraine headache symptoms and an expert system providing diabetes and healthcare resources. Each of the early studies aimed to improve how users find healthcare information in the NLM (National Library of Medicine) databases and local resources based on a front-end tool. Most recently, students investigated a mobile app to attract young adults to interact about healthy eating and a comparative study of FitBittm bracelets and mobile apps such as Health Apptm. The thesis used in all the research projects is that researching interfaces for user-friendly designs and observing human-computer interactions in terms of navigation, understanding and learning can lead to recommendations to improve product development and healthcare tools. Joining Dr. Swain in discussing the research studies in usability are MIS graduate assistants Michelle Robinson and Bijaya Sharma.

Biosketch:

Dr. Deborah E. Swain, PhD., is Associate Professor in the School of Library and Information Sciences at NC Central University in Durham, NC. She has over 20 years experience in process engineering, organizational design, business and technical training for corporations such as IBM, AT&T, and Lucent Technologies/Bell Labs. In 1999, she completed her doctorate in Information Science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She also has an MA from UNC-CH in English and a BA from Duke University. She has presented at conferences, published articles and contributed chapters to books on social network analysis, collaboration, health informatics, and knowledge management. In addition to her faculty position at NC Central University, Dr. Swain has also taught at UNC-Chapel Hill, NC State University, and Campbell University. She currently teaches graduate courses in health informatics, expert systems (knowledge bases) and human factors (usability research). Ms. Michelle Robinson (MIS student) has her BA in Public Health Education from NCCU, has studied healthcare in Africa, and is completing an internship at Durham County Health Services.  Ms. Bijay Sharma (MIS student)  has an undergraduate degree in veterinary science from Nepal, is studying health informatics, and recently was part of an award winning poster presentation at the 2018 NCCU Research Symposium (“Usability of Tool for Tracking Fitness” with Tomika Royster and Sparshini Thota).

Informatics Research Seminar: The Association Between Hospital Meaningful Use Performance and Patient Experience, Hospital 30-Day Re-admissions

Speaker: Jason Mose, PhD
Presented from ECU

Broadcast Link: Seminar

At Duke, all seminars live or broadcast will be held in Hock Auditorium from 4-5 pm.

Abstract:

Some of the key objectives of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid (CMS) meaningful use (MU) program (and now advancing care information under Quality Payment Program for office based providers) include patient engagement, effective communication and care coordination. The program was designed with the view that Electronic Health Records (EHRs) have the potential to empower patients, foster patient engagement, enhance self-care and preventive behaviors. In addition, meaningful use, as designed, may encourage improvement in care coordination by marshaling personnel and other resources needed to facilitate the exchange of information among care providers and patients.

This presentation will review findings from a study that sought to determine whether: a) performance in meaningful use patient engagement and care coordination objectives are associated with improved patient experience, b) performance on meaningful use patient engagement and care coordination objectives are associated with 30-day hospital readmissions, and c) patient experience performance is associated with 30-day hospital readmissions, controlling for MU patient engagement and care coordination.

Biosketch:

Jason Mose, PhD, MBA, MS, CHFP, is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Health Services and Information Management at East Carolina University. Jason earned a baccalaureate degree in business administration with a concentration in information management systems from Montclair State University in New Jersey, a master’s degree in health services management and policy from New School University in New York, an MBA from New Jersey City University, also in New Jersey. Lastly, Jason earned his PhD in Health Policy and Management from the Gillings School of Global Public Health at UNC Chapel Hill. His dissertation topic was “Estimating the Effects Of Electronic Health Records (EHRs) Sophistication and EHRs Years of Experience on Health Care Quality, Patient Experience, 30-Day Readmissions, and Profitability in U.S Acute Care Hospitals.”

Informatics Research Seminar: Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance-Data Mining and Knowledge Discovery

Speaker: Cristina Lanzas, PhD
Presented from UNC-C

Broadcast Link: Seminar

At Duke, all seminars live or broadcast will be held in Hock Auditorium from 4-5 pm.

Abstract:

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a national public health concern. In this study we demonstrate a nationwide AMR surveillance network and utilize data inputs from multiple agencies (USDA, FDA, etc) and how to track AMR gene flow using a mathematical model.

Biosketch:

Dr. Cristina Lanzas is an associate professor of epidemiology at  the College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University. She received her Ph.D. and completed postdoc training at Cornell University. She is specializing in data analysis and mathematical modeling of various infectious diseases. She is leading PI of multiple grants, including R01s from NIH/NIGMS.

Informatics Research Seminar: The North Carolina Statewide Telepsychiatry Program

Speaker: Brian P. Cooper, Jr, MHA
Presented from UNC-CH

Broadcast Link: Seminar

At Duke, all seminars live or broadcast will be held in Hock Auditorium from 4-5 pm.

Abstract:

Of North Carolina’s 100 counties, 70 are considered rural. Many rural communities in North Carolina experience a lack of access to health care services and are designated Health Professional Shortage Areas due to workforce shortages in primary care, mental health, and dental health. Telehealth and telemedicine can help to increase access to care by connecting patients with a provider at a distant site. Initiatives like the North Carolina Statewide Telepsychiatry Program (NC-STeP) provide virtual care services across the state and have been successful in improving outcomes for rural and underserved populations.

Biosketch:

Brian Cooper, Jr., MHA is the Telepsychiatry & Rural Hospital Specialist for the North Carolina Office of Rural Health, a division of the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services. His role involves the administration of two federal grants that benefit small and rural hospitals across North Carolina. Brian is also heavily involved with the North Carolina Statewide Telepsychiatry Program and served as the primary author for the telemedicine study recently conducted by the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services. Brian holds a Master of Healthcare Administration from the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health and has a passion for working with rural and underserved communities.

Informatics Research Seminar: Public Libraries as Partners in Healthy Communities

Speaker: Noah Lenstra, PhD
Presented from NCCU

Broadcast Link: Seminar

At Duke, all seminars live or broadcast will be held in Hock Auditorium from 4-5 pm.

Abstract:

Dr. Noah Lenstra will be sharing information on how public libraries in the U.S. and Canada support public health through community partnerships. In the U.S. there are 16,536 public libraries, and with recent and ongoing changes in how people access information this ubiquitous social infrastructure has begun to change. Data from the Public Library Association show that between FY2012 and FY2016 attendance at public library programs in the U.S. increased by 27.5% This finding illustrates how people use public libraries differently than they have in the past. They come to attend and participate in programs, many of which form out of community partnerships. This talk begins with the current state of research on how public libraries contribute to public health. Much of this research focuses on consumer health information services, or how public librarians help answer questions related to health. Dr. Lenstra’s research suggests that we do not know enough about other ways that public libraries contribute to heath, namely through the rise of health programming in libraries, which includes things like yoga and tai chi classes, among many others. Based on two studies — a survey of 1622 public librarians in the U.S. and Canada and a series of in-depth interviews with 37 North Carolina public librarians — Dr. Lenstra discusses what health programs public libraries currently offer, what community partnerships undergird these programs, and what impacts these programs have, in terms of physical and health literacies. The talk concludes with an interactive discussion, in which attendees will learn how health informatics scholars and practitioners can best work with public librarians to powerfully contribute to public health outcomes.

Biosketch:

Dr. Noah Lenstra, MLIS is an Assistant Professor of Library and Information Studies in the School of Education at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, where he is also an Affiliated Faculty member in the Gerontology Department. Dr. Lenstra studied at the School of Information Sciences at the University of Illinois, completing his Ph.D. in 2016. He currently serves on the Advisory Board for the Public Library Association’s Initiative to Advance Health Literacy and Consumer Health Information in Public Libraries, an initiative funded by National Network of Libraries of Medicine, a unit of the NIH’s National Library of Medicine. His current research focuses on how public libraries support public health through programming and partnerships. With his colleague Dr. Ellen Rubenstein from the University of Oklahoma, he has published “Health Literacy and Physical Literacy: Public Library Practices, Challenges, and Opportunities,” in the Proceedings of the 2018 ALISE Conference. His research on this topic has also been published or has been accepted for publication in Library Quarterly, Evidence Based Library and Information Practice, Journal of Library Administration, Public Library Quarterly, and Advances in Library Administration and Organization. More information on Dr. Lenstra’s background and work can be found on his website: http://www.noahlenstra.com/.

Informatics Research Seminar: Patient-Centered Health Records and Exchange via Blockchain

Speakers: Ray Hylock, PhD
Presented from ECU

Broadcast Link: Seminar

At Duke, all seminars live or broadcast will be held in Hock Auditorium from 4-5 pm.

Abstract:

The world is abuzz with blockchain – the secure, distributed ledger made famous by Bitcoin. Daily, we read of yet another startup or how an organization is seeking to integrate the technology into its infrastructure. While blockchain has been actively deployed in the financial sector for many years, its disruptive nature has only recently become apparent. As a result, researchers and technologists from virtually every domain have sought to implement blockchain. While healthcare is not an exception, the very essence of health data along with questions regarding blockchain’s role in delivering quality care, have erected barriers to its realization in practice. In this presentation, we will explain the basics of blockchain, discuss its benefits in healthcare (from the patient’s perspective), submit a patient-centered framework, propose solutions to several confounding problems, and present a proof-of-concept prototype named HealthChain.

Biosketch:

Ray Hylock, PhD, is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Health Services and Information Management at East Carolina University. He received his BS in Business Administration with an emphasis in High Technology Management from California State University, San Marcos, and MS and PhD in Informatics with an emphasis in Health Informatics from the University of Iowa. His research primarily focuses on computation advancements to support patient care in the areas of health care databases/data warehouses, federation, advanced data structures, optimization, and heuristics.

Informatics Research Seminar: Patient Portal Usage- A Study of its Antecedents and Patient Outcomes

Speakers: Reginal Silver, DPH, MBA, Chandra Subramaniam, PhD, MBA & Antonis Stylianou, PhD, MBA
Presented from UNC-C

Broadcast Link: Seminar

At Duke, all seminars live or broadcast will be held in Hock Auditorium from 4-5 pm.

Abstract:

Patient portal usage is a significant research topic because of the ongoing proliferation of patient portals driven by the need for providers to comply with Meaningful Use mandates and other legal requirements. Portal proliferation has also been driven by motivations to address the rising costs and improve the quality of healthcare, factors important in the current political and economic environment and of great importance to both small and large businesses as they struggle to reduce costs. Despite these motivations, a majority of Americans are either unaware of or do not have access to digital tools to better manage their health care. The motivating factors of portal usage remain unclear, hampering healthcare providers from being compliant and from exploiting the full potential of the technology. Our research study will investigate the factors that influence patient portal usage and its impact on health-seeking behaviors and health outcomes.

Biosketches:

Reginald Silver, DPH, MBA
Clinical Assistant Professor, Belk College of Business, UNC-Charlotte
Dr. Silver teaches courses in management information systems, statistics, and business computing.  His research interests include human and systems integration, healthcare information technology, business analytics, and big data. Prior to joining Belk College, he had over 18 years of experience in healthcare operations and finance.

Antonis Stylianou, PhD, MBA
Chair, Dept. of Business Information Systems & Operations Mgmt, UNC-Charlotte
Dr. Stylianou also serves as professor of Management Information Systems and Data Science and Business Analytics. In addition to consulting with several Fortune 1000 companies and non-profit organizations, his industry experience includes an appointment in the Information Management department at Duke Energy. He currently serves as a senior editor for the Database for Advances in Information Systems journal.

Chandrasekar Subramaniam, PhD, MBA
Associate Profesor of Managment Information Systems, UNC Charlotte
Dr. Subramaniam’s research projects have been funded by corporations such as Caterpillar, Motorola, State Farm Insurance, and the Center for e-Business and IT Management at the University of Illinois. He has published in several leading journals in information systems and contributed chapters for two books on electronic commerce.

 

Informatics Research Seminar: Health Information System Improvement in Low-and-Middle Income Countries

Speaker: Manish Kumar, MPH, MS
Presented from UNC-CH

Broadcast Link: Seminar

At Duke, all seminars live or broadcast will be held in Hock Auditorium from 4-5 pm.

Abstract:

While there has been a growing emphasis on Health Information Systems (HIS) strengthening and measuring how they contributes to improved health outcomes, there is limited understanding of factors affecting HIS improvement at different stages of its development. The Monitoring and Evaluation to Assess and Use Results (MEASURE) Evaluation Phase IV is a USAID-funded five-year (2014-2019) project. MEASURE Evaluation’s mission is to contribute to better health for people living in low-income countries by assisting governments and health institutions to generate and use information to change what doesn’t work and to scale up what does. This seminar will review the five stages of improvement together with associated domains/sub-domains and discuss attributes defining  HIS improvement at different stages of HIS development.

Biosketch:

Manish Kumar, MPH, MS, is the Senior Technical Specialist for Health Systems Strengthening in the MEASURE evaluation Project at the University of North Carolina. His work focuses on providing technical and capacity-building support for implementation of the Data for Accountability, Transparency and Impact Monitoring (DATIM) System of PEPFAR in more than 50 developing countries. He is currently also a PhD student in the Carolina Health Informatics Program at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He is a member of the Digital Health and Interoperability working group of the Health Data Collaborative, an inclusive partnership of international agencies, governments, philanthropies, donors and academics, with the common aim of improving health data.

Informatics Research Seminar: Clinical Data Research Networks – Leveraging the Value of EHRs

Speaker: Janis Curtis, MSPH, MA
Presented from Duke University

Broadcast Link: SEMINAR

 

Abstract:

Many clinical trials require analysis of clinical data for large number of study participants. The traditional way of identifying cohorts and collecting clinical data for large number of study participants is untenable.  The use of EHR systems in most health care delivery organizations in the United States has resulted in a plethora of electronic clinical data.  Consequently, this is a tremendous benefit to researchers and significantly aids various types of research, including but not limited to health services research and clinical trials.  Health care providers are forming networks called “clinical data research networks” to pool their EHR data in a federated manner to support research efforts, research that is essential in the evolving value-based payment environment.  This presentation will describe what a clinical data research network (CDRN) is, identify the benefits of CDRNs for research, review the CDRNs in which Duke Health is currently a member, and include a demo of i2b2 and SHRINE, two of the CDRN data query tools used at Duke.

Biosketch:

Janis L. Curtis, MSPH, MA, is the Associate Director of Clinical Data Research Networks (CDRNs) in the Office of Research Informatics at Duke Health. Ms. Curtis has responsibility for establishing and managing the technical infrastructure and processes at Duke needed to respond to requests for clinical data and/or for recruitment of co-investigators and study participants is support of clinical research.  She is a long-time Duke employee and has held a variety of senior IT management and leadership positions including Business Relationship Management Executive for Outpatient Services and Associate CIO for Entity Support where she was responsible for IT operations at Duke Regional Hospital, Duke Raleigh Hospital, Duke Home Care and Hospice, and the Duke Primary Care.  As Duke’s representative, Ms. Curtis has served on several State of North Carolina committees related to HIE governance, development of HIT Strategic Plan, etc.  Prior to joining the Duke executive management team, she was the Deputy Commissioner and Executive Director for the NC Medical Database Commission.   She currently serves as Chair of the Health Information Management Systems Society (HIMSS) Davies Enterprise Committee and as a member of the HIMSS Analytics Advisory Board. She has served on the North Carolina Healthcare Information and Communications Alliance (NCHICA) Board of Directors and on several NCHICA Committees. In 2013, she received the HIMSS John A Page Outstanding Service Award.  Ms. Curtis received her MSPH with concentration in health policy and management from the Harvard School of Public Health and her MA in Liberal Studies from Duke University.