Duke Mobile App Gateway

Mobile applications are opening doors to more individualized and accurate patient care and research. For faculty and students who want to develop mobile applications that support healthcare, Duke now offers support for custom development of mobile technology solutions. The Mobile App Gateway team includes representatives from the Duke Office of Research Initiatives, Office of Research Informatics (ORI), Duke Health Technology Solutions (DHTS), Duke University School of Nursing (DUSON) and is funded by the Clinical & Translational Science Institute (CTSI).  Services include consultations, tools and hands-on workshops to assist from concept through deployment, in addition to access to resources both at Duke and the local technology community.  For general questions, contact mobileapps@duke.edu.

Warren Kibbe, PhD named chief for Translational Biomedical Informatics in the Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics

We welcome Warren Kibbe, PhD  to the Duke University School of Medicine as chief for Translational Biomedical Informatics in the Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics and chief data officer for the Duke Cancer Institute.

Dr. Kibbe was the acting Deputy Director of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and director of the NCI’s Center for Biomedical Information and Information Technology prior to his move to Duke.

Go to Duke Scholars for more information on Dr. Kibbe’s accomplishments.

Vivian West, PhD featured in NCHICA Podcast

NCHICA has launched a new podcast series designed to highlight current trends in IT.  The first four podcasts are discussions with speakers at the 22nd Annual Conference in Durham, N.C. September 11-13, 2017 at the Durham Convention Center, including one that is a discussion between Vivian West, PhD, MBA, RN, Associate Director at the Duke Center for Health Informatics and host Janet Kennedy, President and Podcast Host of Get Social Health.  The topic of the discussion and the upcoming session at the annual conference is Artifical Intelligence.

Listen to the Podcast here.

Richesson Appointed DCHI Associate Director of Research

Richesson Appointed DCHI Associate Director of Research

Rachel Richesson, PhD, Associate Professor, Duke University School of Nursing, has been appointed Associate Director of Research at the Duke Center for Health Informatics (DCHI). She has a PhD and MS in Health Informatics and an MPH in Community Health Practice from the University of Texas.. She is a Fellow of the American College of Medical Informatics. She edited the first and only textbook on the topic of Clinical Research Informatics, published in 2012 (Springer). Director of the DCHI Ed Hammond, PhD, expressed his enthusiasm about Dr. Richesson joining the leadership  of DCHI: “We are so excited to include her as part of our leadership team, her expertise in informatics will be invaluable as we strive to promote research in the field .”

Dr. Richesson lectures on various topics related to data standards and interoperability for a number of programs at Duke. During her extensive research career, she has directed the identification and implementation of data standards for multi-national multi-site clinical research and epidemiological studies, including the NIH Rare Diseases Clinical Research Network (RDCRN), Type 1 Diabetes TrialNet, and The Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young (TEDDY) study.  She also helped to design and implement the RDCRN Contact Registry for over 150 rare diseases and supports various patient and disease advocacy organizations to develop patient registries for a number of other conditions.  Dr. Richesson served as co-chair the RDCRN Standards and Registry Committees, and has interacted with a number standards development organizations to represent the clinical research perspective. As part of her original informatics research, she has implemented and evaluated specific standardized coding systems (e.g., SNOMED CT, RxNorm and NDF-RT) in research settings and explored the coverage of these coding systems for various research projects. Further, she works with a number of multi-disciplinary teams to demonstrate how these and other data standards can be used to facilitate the analysis of large data sets to answer important population health questions.

Dr. Richesson currently leads the Phenotype & Data Quality Core for the NIH Health Systems Research Collaboratory, which is developing standards and quality metrics for clinical phenotyping using EHR data in pragmatic clinical trials. As part of the PCORnet Coordinating Center, she participated in developing and promoting standardized approaches for cohort identification using EHRs, including the development of “gold standard” definitions and measuring the predictive value of EHR query algorithms. She also co-led the PCORnet Rare Diseases Task Force with Dr. Priya Kishnani (Duke School of Medicine).

Dr. Richesson is the PI of NLM-funded research to develop a decision support readiness assessment model using specific data requirements for a number of clinical guidelines recommended for emergency medicine, and a co-investigator on a study aiming to improve patient outcomes for individuals with sickle cell diseases that includes the use of a national registry. She has served on a number of leadership roles at the American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA), including the Publications Task Force and the Clinical Research Informatics Working Group. She was Chair of the Scientific Program Committee for the 2014 Clinical Research Informatics Summit, and is on the planning committee for the 2016 AMIA Policy Invitational Summit and the American College of Informatics annual meeting in 2017. Currently, Dr. Richesson is co-chair of the AMIA HIT Standards Advisory Group with Dr. Christopher Chute (Johns Hopkins University).

In her role as Associate Director of Research for DCHI, Dr. Richesson will help promote biomedical informatics research at Duke by collaborating with DCHI on its interdisciplinary approach for education and research designed to bring together informaticians, physicians, nurses, and health care administrators with expertise in aggregation, analysis, and use of informatics to improve human health.

Richesson Invited Expert for Registry Trials Project Meeting

Rachel Richesson, PhD was the invited expert for the Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative Registry Trials Project Expert Meeting in Silver Spring, MD on March 30, 2016. The project focuses on the potential to increase efficiencies and decrease costs throughout the ecosystem by embedding clinical trials within registries. During the expert meeting, participants discussed opportunities to use clinical registries in Clinical Trials.

Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative (CTTI) is a public-private partnership to identify and promote practices that will increase the quality and efficiency of clinical trials. Once a specific aspect of the clinical trials process is targeted for improvement, CTTI establishes a project in order to more thoroughly explore the various elements that create the issue at hand. It is comprised of more than 60 organizations from across the clinical trial enterprise. CTTI was established in 2007 by the US Food and Drug Administration and Duke University. CTTI’s approach includes conducting projects to better understand the range of current practices, assess alternative approaches, understand barriers to change, and propose recommendations for improvement. Each member contributes their ideas for projects, participates in their conduct and analysis, and are committed to disseminating CTTI recommendations and encouraging adoption of system changes that will improve the efficiency of clinical trials. CTTI projects result in a variety of deliverables, or products, which can then be used to promote adoption and implementation of the ensuing recommendations.

Hammond writes Foreword for “Electronic Health Records for Quality Nursing and Health Care” Reference Book about EHR Implementation and Utilization

W. Ed Hammond, PhD writes the foreword for a newly published comprehensive reference book titled, “Electronic Health Records for Quality Nursing and Health Care” . The book is written by author, Tiffany Kelley, Ph.D., MBA, RN, Founder and CEO, Nightingale Apps, LLC, Affiliate, Duke University, Associate Adjunct Professor, Northeastern University and is published by DEStech Publications, Inc.

Excerpt from the Dr. Hammond’s foreword:

“The Electronic Health Record (EHR) is the centerpiece of the effective use of informatics in health and health care. As we create big data and increasingly depend on decision making with Computer Decision Support, quality becomes a major concern. We are not yet at the level of quality we need for the important use of data and extraction of knowledge. Electronic Health Records for Quality Nursing & Health Care provides an opportunity to view the changing roles of nurses to take full advantage of the opportunities offered by technology and the use of that technology for healthcare. The book is an easy read and is applicable for undergraduate or graduate work, or even just for someone interested in the field. The book addresses the right level of depth on a topic–deep enough for the reader to have a good understanding yet not get bogged down in too many details…”