Informatics Research Seminar: All About SILS (Research, Degrees, Faculty)

September 1 @ 4:00 – 5:00 pm

 

Speaker: Javed Mostafa, PhD
Presented from UNC-CH

Abstract:

One of the nation’s top-ranked schools of library and information studies  by U.S. News & World Report, SILS consistently takes a leadership role in today’s ever-changing information and library science landscape.

Mission
SILS educates innovative and responsible thinkers who will lead the information professions; discovers principles and impacts of information; creates systems, techniques, and policies to advance information processes and services; and advances information creation, access, use, management, and stewardship to improve the quality of life for diverse local, national, and global communities.

This mission is rooted in the values of our field, our university, and our school and seeks to achieve our vision as the leading information school in the world.  It has four components: education, basic research, design and development and real world engagement.  Our educational mission is manifested in our degree programs, in field studies and internships, and in the collaborative research our students do with faculty and other students.  Our basic research mission is rooted in the recognition that data, information, and knowledge are the engines of science, industry, and the human experience.  We study how information is created and flows among people and organizations, and how it is used and reused, managed, and preserved.  Our design and development mission manifests in interacting systems that include computational components (hardware and software), organizational components (indexes, metadata, ontologies), access components (user interfaces), and policy components. We develop and evaluate these interacting components in principled and systematic projects and investigations.   Our engagement mission is motivated by the recognition that information is socially embedded in culture and that real world problems are solved by people armed with knowledge of the past, contemporary information, and tools for exploration and decision making.  Engagement means not only leveraging information and tools beyond the campus, but also that protocols, practices, rights, and responsibilities be defined and defended and that people learn about them in context.

The School of Information and Library Science seeks to advance the profession and practice of librarianship and information science; to prepare students for careers in the field of information and library science; and to make significant contributions to the study of information. Faculty members further these goals by teaching and advisory work; by research and scholarly publishing; and by service to the school, the university, the state, and the professional community. The American Library Association (ALA) accredits both the master of science in library science degree and the master of science in information science degree.The Southern Association of Colleges and Schools accredits the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

SILS ALA Reaccreditation Program Presentation

SILS 2013 to 2020 Strategic Plan

The School of Information and Library Science (SILS) stands among the leading research-intensive schools devoted to educating information professionals. In the past two decades SILS and its peers have broadened research and educational missions beyond scholarly publishing and libraries to the entire spectrum of human information activities. This trend is manifested in what is characterized as the international i-School movement and SILS is an exemplar in demonstrating this 21st century view of information theory, practice, and education. This strategic plan benefits from the advances and challenges of the first decade of the new century and provides a foundation for the SILS of 2020 and beyond.

Biosketch:

Javed Mostafa is the Director of the Carolina Health Informatics Program and the Director of the Laboratory of Applied Informatics Research. His research concentrates on information retrieval problems, particularly related to search and user-system interactions in large-scale document/data repositories. He also serves as the Deputy Director of the Biomedical Informatics Core at the NC Translational & Clinical Sciences Institute and has current research engagements in biomedical data mining, analysis, visualization, user interface design, and multi-modal human-computer interaction. He regularly serves on program and organizing committees for major conferences and participates as reviewer for major grant initiatives.
Javed served as an associate editor for the ACM Transactions on Information Systems for eight years. He currently serves as editor-in-chief of the Journal of the Association for Information Science & Technology and he also serves as an associate editor of the ACM Transactions on Internet Technology.
Translating scientific advances into health care improvements is a passion for Javed, and based on support from UNC’s Translational & Clinical Sciences Institute, he co-founded a company concentrating on patient-centric decision support and streamlined care workflow called Keona Health. At UNC, Javed holds a joint faculty position in information science in the School of Information and Library Science and in the Biomedical Research Imaging Center in the School of Medicine. Additionally, he holds the title of Adjunct Professor of Community and Family Medicine, School of Medicine, Duke University.

DHTS Staff Present Poster at Healthcare Data Warehouse Association Conference (HDWA 2013)

Michael Kahl, MBA, PMP, a Senior Data Analyst for Information Management & Enterprise Reporting at Duke Health Technology Solutions (DHTS), presented a poster titled “Traceability in Healthcare Data Sharing Projects Through the Use of Data Warehousing Artifacts:Methods from the Southeastern Diabetes Initiative (SEDI)” at the Healthcare Data Warehouse Association (HDWA) conference October 1-3, 2013 in Scottsdale, Arizona. The poster, authored by the members of the Southeastern Diabetes Initiative (SEDI) Informatics team—including Kahl and fellow DHTS Information Management department staff members Felicia Dunston, Lori Morris, and Shelley Rusincovitch—details the standard process followed by the team to gather, analyze, profile, and evaluate data shared from varying EHR platforms in use at the current data sharing partner sites, which are located in four counties across the southeastern United States (Cabarrus County and Durham County, NC; Mingo County, WV; Quitman County, MS).

The goal of the process is to provide a mechanism that drives data traceability within data sourced from each EHR platform  and facilitates thorough analysis and profiling of the shared data during Phase 1 of the SEDI Datamart development. To meet the goal, output documentation is created during each step of the process that serves as input documentation for the next step. As a result, the output artifacts that are created ultimately serve as cross-references and reality checks during the development of the SEDI Datamart. The SEDI Informatics team has determined that by following the process as well as by creating thorough documentation in the way of Source System Analysis Documentation, Data Dictionaries for the Data Extracts, and Data Submission Reports throughout each step of the approach, the building of the SEDI Datamart will be more consistent across data sharing partners. Less duplication of effort when future data sharing partners are integrated into the datamart is also expected to be a tangible benefit. As a result, the team believes adequate flexibility and scalability is allowed for while still keeping  the level of stability necessary in order to ensure quality data  exists when integration is implemented as part of Phase 2 of the SEDI Datamart development.

DHTS Staff Present Poster at Healthcare Data Warehouse Association Conference (HDWA 2013)

 

 

Michael Kahl, MBA, PMP, a Senior Data Analyst for Information Management & Enterprise Reporting at Duke Health Technology Solutions (DHTS), presented a poster titled “Traceability in Healthcare Data Sharing Projects Through the Use of Data Warehousing Artifacts: Methods from the Southeastern Diabetes Initiative (SEDI)” at the Healthcare Data Warehouse Association (HDWA) conference October 1-3, 2013 in Scottsdale, Arizona. The poster, authored by the members of the Southeastern Diabetes Initiative (SEDI) Informatics team—including Kahl and fellow DHTS Information Management department staff members Felicia Dunston, Lori Morris, and Shelley Rusincovitch—details the standard process followed by the team to gather, analyze, profile, and evaluate data shared from varying EHR platforms in use at the current data sharing partner sites, which are located in four counties across the southeastern United States (Cabarrus County and Durham County, NC; Mingo County, WV; Quitman County, MS).

The goal of the process is to provide a mechanism that drives data traceability within data sourced from each EHR platform  and facilitates thorough analysis and profiling of the shared data during Phase 1 of the SEDI Datamart development. To meet the goal, output documentation is created during each step of the process that serves as input documentation for the next step. As a result, the output artifacts that are created ultimately serve as cross-references and reality checks during the development of the SEDI Datamart. The SEDI Informatics team has determined that by following the process as well as by creating thorough documentation in the way of Source System Analysis Documentation, Data Dictionaries for the Data Extracts, and Data Submission Reports throughout each step of the approach, the building of the SEDI Datamart will be more consistent across data sharing partners. Less duplication of effort when future data sharing partners are integrated into the datamart is also expected to be a tangible benefit. As a result, the team believes adequate flexibility and scalability is allowed for while still keeping  the level of stability necessary in order to ensure quality data  exists when integration is implemented as part of Phase 2 of the SEDI Datamart development.

Horvath is Featured Speaker at HIMSS Clinical and Business Intelligence Community Forum

 

 

HIMSS Clinical and Business Intelligence Community Forum

Monica Horvath, PhD presented “An Analytics Framework for Evaluating the Return on Health for Deployment of an Enterprise EHR” at the HIMSS Clinical and Business Intelligence Community Forum, held online September 26, 2013.

Dr. Horvath’s presentation was directed toward large health systems, and it focused on the deployment of EHR technology in these enterprise environments. Specifically, she described how Duke Medicine’s analytics team evaluated the benefits and unintended consequences of an enterprise EHR deployment across two community hospitals, several hundred clinics, and an academic medical center. Forum participants learned how to create strategic objectives for benefits realization, align a benefits realization workgroup to other organizational analytic activities, and
understand the challenges in scoping projects while managing a small
analytics team.

IMIA Yearbook

 

 

The Editorial Board of the 2013 International Medical Informatics Association (IMIA) Yearbook of Medical Informatics has selected an article authored by Duke Clinical Research Institute (DCRI) personnel as one of the best papers in the Clinical Research Informatics subfield of Medical Informatics published in 2012. The article, titled “The database for aggregate analysis of ClinicalTrials.gov (AACT) and subsequent regrouping by clinical specialty,” was authored by Asba Tasneem, PhD, Laura Aberle, Hari Ananth, Swati Chakraborty, Karen Chiswell, PhD, Brian McCourt, and Ricardo Pietrobon, MD. The yearbook was published in August 2013 and is available to over 20,000 members of the healthcare and biomedical scientific communities through a print version or online access. It reaches members in more than 40 societies participating to IMIA worldwide.

 

Improving the Public Interface for Use of Aggregate Data in ClinicalTrials.gov

 

 

Asba Tasneem

by Asba Tasneem, PhD

ClinicalTrials.gov is a registry of human clinical research studies hosted by the U.S. National Institutes of Health, through the National Library of Medicine. The purpose of ClinicalTrials.gov is to provide a central resource for those seeking information on
individual clinical research projects and to increase visibility of human subjects’ research. A Duke project team of principal investigators from several therapeutic areas and staff members from DCRI-CRI, DCTI-IT, DCRI-CDM, DCRI-Communications, and CTTI downloaded publicly available registry data from ClinicalTrials.gov and developed a restructured and reformatted relational database under the Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative (CTTI) grant. This is referred to as the database for Aggregate Analysis of ClincalTrials.gov (AACT). 

Recently, NLM made the results dataset available through public download. In 2013, the Duke team extended the AACT database to include the results dataset. An updated version of the AACT database is now available on the CTTI website. The annual release of the Aggregate Analysis of ClinicalTrials.gov (AACT) database went live in Production on December 6, 2013. The latest version contains data downloaded from ClinicalTrials.gov on September 27, 2013 and includes study registration fields, basic
results fields, and adverse events reporting fields. This is the first attempt to re-structure basic results and adverse events datasets from ClinicalTrials.gov for the purpose of aggregate analysis. The Duke team is scheduled to post dataset extracts on the Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative (CTTI) public website in early January 2014. The database is planned for refresh on a semi-annual basis, with the next release scheduled for April 2014.

Robert Califf, MD is the Principal Investigator for this project, and Asba Tasneem, PhD is the Project Leader.

Johnson Participates on Science Committee for MHCI 2013

 

 

Constance Johnson, PhD was a member of the Science Committee for the first International Conference on Multimedia and Human Computer Interaction (MHCI 2013) held July 18-19, 2013 in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. The conference was organized by the International Academy of Science, Engineering and Technology (International ASET Inc.).

MCHI 13 was attended by participants from around the world who are active researchers in the fields of multimedia and human computer interaction, and related sub-fields. The goal of the conference is to provide a means for researchers to exchange their ideas and share their research, in addition to providing an environment that promotes collaboration. Selected papers from the conference are to be published in two new forthcoming journals: the  Journal of Multimedia Theory and Application (JMTA), and the International Journal of Virtual Worlds and Human Computer Interaction (VWHCI).

Japanese Delegation Visits DCHI

 

 

Recently, Duke University hosted Kiyoshi Matsuoka and Hiroshi Ohtsu from Juntendo University and Yoshiteru Chiba from University of Tokyo, collaborators with Duke over the years on the infrastructure of their Clinical Research Institute. Anita Walden, Senior Informaticist Project Leader, arranged the meeting.

Their visit included discussions focused on the uses and benefits of REDCap and some of the challenges encountered when converting it to Japanese. Duke’s Office of Clinical Research (DOCR) provided an overview of the REDCap model and the role of the Research Management Team, which supports investigators’ development and data-management activities. Duke Health Technology Solutions (DHTS) and the Informatics Center for Learning Healthcare presented several examples of the integration of clinical care with research. They shared examples of the use of tools, technology, and standards to facilitate integration between Duke’s healthcare system and research groups focusing on the Clinical Data Warehouse, Assessment, Survey, and Questionnaire (ASQ), and the plans for using the Retrieved form for Data-Capture (RFD) with EPIC.

Education and training opportunities were also discussed. The Duke Clinical Research Institute’s (DCRI) Quality Assurance and Regulatory Control group is embarking on a collaborative education and training program, Training, Education and Mentoring with Duke (TEaM), with partners in Asia. The visitors expressed interest and agreement on the risk-based monitoring and auditing approaches, and indicated that the training may be beneficial to their organizations. They were particularly interested in the informatics and training programs that were presented by Duke Center for Health Informatics (DCHI), and asked for more information about participating in online training or training conducted within Japan. In addition to acquiring skills in informatics, the group was seeking guidance on developing the infrastructure to support informatics activities that will enable interoperability, and improve the uses of technology and design methods to enhance the health of patients and facilitate research. The  discussions opened the door to further collaboration between our institutions.

Duke participants for the visit included:

  • Steve Woody, Associate Chief Information Officer for Clinical and Translational Research
  • Dr. Ed Hammond, Director of Duke Center for Health Informatics
  • Brian McCourt, Director of Duke Clinical Informatics
  • Kaye Fendt, Director of Quality Assurance and Regulatory Compliance
  • Howard Shang, Senior Director of the Informatics Center for Learning Healthcare
  • Dr. Vivian West, Associate Director of Duke Center for Health Informatics
  • Susan Budinger, Associate Director of Research Operations, Duke Office of Clinical Research
  • Reza Rostami, Assistant Director of Quality Assurance and Regulatory Compliance
  • Dr. Yousuf Zafar, Assistant Professor of Medicine
  • Allison Handler, Senior Project Leader
  • Jeff Hawley, Analyst Programmer with Duke Office of Clinical Research

Kiyoshi Matsuoka, Hiroshi Ohtsu, Yoshiteru Chiba, Anita Walden, Vivian West, PhD, Claire Miller, Rene’ Hart

Johnson Speaks for the Duke-Johnson & Johnson Nurse Leadership Program

 

 

Constance M. Johnson, PhD, MS, RN did a presentation on using data to drive decision making December 10, 2013. The presentation was organized by the Duke University Department of Community and Family Medicine as part of the Duke-Johnson & Johnson Nurse Leadership Program, a year-long, part-time program focused on developing advanced practice nurses as leaders in the clinical setting.