Gabriel invited to serve as the Vice Chair for Data Science track at the AMIA 2019 Informatics Summit

Davera Gabriel, RN, a Research Informaticist for Clinical Research Informatics at  the Duke Clinical Research Institute, has been selected as the Vice Chair for the Data Science track for the AMIA 2019 Informatics Summit. The chair for the 2019 Summit is Umberto Tachinardi, MD, University of Wisconsin – Madison. The Summit will take place March 25-28, 2019 in San Francisco, CA.

Director of National Library of Medicine visit to Duke University

Dr. Patricia Flatley Brennan, Director of the National Library of Medicine (NLM) delivered the Harriet Cook Carter Lecture at the Duke University School of Nursing on Thursday, February 15, 2018. Titled Transforming Data in Knowledge and Knowledge into Health: The National Library of Medicine Strategic Plan 2017-2027, Dr. Brennan talked about the ten year strategic plan of the NLM, which includes accelerating the discovery through data-driven research, reaching more people through dissemination and engagement, and building a workforce for data-driven research and health.  A panel discussion, moderated by Rachel Richesson, PhD (Associate Professor, DUSON) was held that in addition to  Dr. Brennan included Erich Huang, MD, PhD (Assistant Dean, Biomedical Informatics & Co-Director, Duke Forge) , Geoffrey Ginsburg, MD, PhD (Professor of Medicine, Director of Applied Genomics and Precision Medicine) and Megan Von Isenburg, MSLS (Associate Dean for Library Sciences and Archives, Duke University School of Medicine.)

Dr. Brennan holds a Masters in Nursing and a PhD in Industrial Engineering.  She has been a clinical practice nurse in critical and psychiatric care and held academic positions at Marquette University, Case Western Reserve University,  and the University of Wisconsin-Madison.  She is a pioneer in the development of information systems, having developed a variety of networks and communication services that promote healthcare.

To listen to this presentation click here.

Duke Well-Represented at AMIA 2017

Duke Medicine’s Chief Health Information Officer Eric Poon, MD, MPH  was inducted as a Fellow into the American College of Medical Informatics (ACMI) during the recent AMIA symposium.  ACMI is a professional society of elected Fellows from the United States and abroad who have made significant and sustaining  contributions to the field of biomedical informatics.

A variety of  clinicians, faculty and staff attended the meeting, doing a number of presentations.  Click here for more information.

Warren Kibbe, PhD named chief for Translational Biomedical Informatics in the Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics

We welcome Warren Kibbe, PhD  to the Duke University School of Medicine as chief for Translational Biomedical Informatics in the Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics and chief data officer for the Duke Cancer Institute.

Dr. Kibbe was the acting Deputy Director of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and director of the NCI’s Center for Biomedical Information and Information Technology prior to his move to Duke.

Go to Duke Scholars for more information on Dr. Kibbe’s accomplishments.

Vivian West, PhD featured in NCHICA Podcast

NCHICA has launched a new podcast series designed to highlight current trends in IT.  The first four podcasts are discussions with speakers at the 23rd Annual Conference in Durham, N.C. September 11-13, 2017 at the Durham Convention Center, including one that is a discussion between Vivian West, PhD, MBA, RN, Associate Director at the Duke Center for Health Informatics and host Janet Kennedy, President and Podcast Host of Get Social Health.  The topic of the discussion and the upcoming session at the annual conference is Artifical Intelligence.

Listen to the Podcast here.

Ed Hammond, PhD recent interview

 

Ken Rubin, Director of Standards and Interoperability (VHA Office of Knowledge Based Systems) for the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and the Co-Chair of the Healthcare Domain Task Force at Object Management Group (OMG) recently interviewed Ed Hammond, PhD during an OMG technical committee (TC) meeting in Reston, VA.

The discussion included Dr. Hammond’s long standing career in health informatics and his role in the accomplishments of Health Level 7 (HL7) over the last ten years.   When asked about the TC meeting and what he saw as the key benefit to holding an event with stakeholders from many different industries, Dr. Hammond stated, “informatics has no boundaries.  It really does go across all sorts of professions.  It takes equality across multiple professions to do what we are trying to do–clinicians and technologists working together with different backgrounds solving common problems.”

Interview Link

 

Informatics Research Seminar: All About SILS (Research, Degrees, Faculty)

September 1 @ 4:00 – 5:00 pm

 

Speaker: Javed Mostafa, PhD
Presented from UNC-CH

Abstract:

One of the nation’s top-ranked schools of library and information studies  by U.S. News & World Report, SILS consistently takes a leadership role in today’s ever-changing information and library science landscape.

Mission
SILS educates innovative and responsible thinkers who will lead the information professions; discovers principles and impacts of information; creates systems, techniques, and policies to advance information processes and services; and advances information creation, access, use, management, and stewardship to improve the quality of life for diverse local, national, and global communities.

This mission is rooted in the values of our field, our university, and our school and seeks to achieve our vision as the leading information school in the world.  It has four components: education, basic research, design and development and real world engagement.  Our educational mission is manifested in our degree programs, in field studies and internships, and in the collaborative research our students do with faculty and other students.  Our basic research mission is rooted in the recognition that data, information, and knowledge are the engines of science, industry, and the human experience.  We study how information is created and flows among people and organizations, and how it is used and reused, managed, and preserved.  Our design and development mission manifests in interacting systems that include computational components (hardware and software), organizational components (indexes, metadata, ontologies), access components (user interfaces), and policy components. We develop and evaluate these interacting components in principled and systematic projects and investigations.   Our engagement mission is motivated by the recognition that information is socially embedded in culture and that real world problems are solved by people armed with knowledge of the past, contemporary information, and tools for exploration and decision making.  Engagement means not only leveraging information and tools beyond the campus, but also that protocols, practices, rights, and responsibilities be defined and defended and that people learn about them in context.

The School of Information and Library Science seeks to advance the profession and practice of librarianship and information science; to prepare students for careers in the field of information and library science; and to make significant contributions to the study of information. Faculty members further these goals by teaching and advisory work; by research and scholarly publishing; and by service to the school, the university, the state, and the professional community. The American Library Association (ALA) accredits both the master of science in library science degree and the master of science in information science degree.The Southern Association of Colleges and Schools accredits the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

SILS ALA Reaccreditation Program Presentation

SILS 2013 to 2020 Strategic Plan

The School of Information and Library Science (SILS) stands among the leading research-intensive schools devoted to educating information professionals. In the past two decades SILS and its peers have broadened research and educational missions beyond scholarly publishing and libraries to the entire spectrum of human information activities. This trend is manifested in what is characterized as the international i-School movement and SILS is an exemplar in demonstrating this 21st century view of information theory, practice, and education. This strategic plan benefits from the advances and challenges of the first decade of the new century and provides a foundation for the SILS of 2020 and beyond.

Biosketch:

Javed Mostafa is the Director of the Carolina Health Informatics Program and the Director of the Laboratory of Applied Informatics Research. His research concentrates on information retrieval problems, particularly related to search and user-system interactions in large-scale document/data repositories. He also serves as the Deputy Director of the Biomedical Informatics Core at the NC Translational & Clinical Sciences Institute and has current research engagements in biomedical data mining, analysis, visualization, user interface design, and multi-modal human-computer interaction. He regularly serves on program and organizing committees for major conferences and participates as reviewer for major grant initiatives.
Javed served as an associate editor for the ACM Transactions on Information Systems for eight years. He currently serves as editor-in-chief of the Journal of the Association for Information Science & Technology and he also serves as an associate editor of the ACM Transactions on Internet Technology.
Translating scientific advances into health care improvements is a passion for Javed, and based on support from UNC’s Translational & Clinical Sciences Institute, he co-founded a company concentrating on patient-centric decision support and streamlined care workflow called Keona Health. At UNC, Javed holds a joint faculty position in information science in the School of Information and Library Science and in the Biomedical Research Imaging Center in the School of Medicine. Additionally, he holds the title of Adjunct Professor of Community and Family Medicine, School of Medicine, Duke University.