Hammond is Keynote Speaker at The 17th International HL7 Interoperability Conference (IHIC 2017)

Oct 22-24 in Athens, Greece

 

W. Ed Hammond, PhD will be a Keynote Speaker at the upcoming IHIC 2017 Conference.

The IHIC is a forum for implementers and scientists to present and discuss concepts, models and implementations for innovative interoperable e-Health solutions. The conference aims to play the role of an interface between science, research, and practice with regards to interoperability in the health and social care domain to share experiences and best practices. Scientific papers, demonstrations, and practice reports will be presented at this conference.

For more information click here.

Vivian West, PhD featured in NCHICA Podcast

NCHICA has launched a new podcast series designed to highlight current trends in IT.  The first four podcasts are discussions with speakers at the 22nd Annual Conference in Durham, N.C. September 11-13, 2017 at the Durham Convention Center, including one that is a discussion between Vivian West, PhD, MBA, RN, Associate Director at the Duke Center for Health Informatics and host Janet Kennedy, President and Podcast Host of Get Social Health.  The topic of the discussion and the upcoming session at the annual conference is Artifical Intelligence.

Listen to the Podcast here.

Ed Hammond, PhD recent interview

 

Ken Rubin, Director of Standards and Interoperability (VHA Office of Knowledge Based Systems) for the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and the Co-Chair of the Healthcare Domain Task Force at Object Management Group (OMG) recently interviewed Ed Hammond, PhD during an OMG technical committee (TC) meeting in Reston, VA.

The discussion included Dr. Hammond’s long standing career in health informatics and his role in the accomplishments of Health Level 7 (HL7) over the last ten years.   When asked about the TC meeting and what he saw as the key benefit to holding an event with stakeholders from many different industries, Dr. Hammond stated, “informatics has no boundaries.  It really does go across all sorts of professions.  It takes equality across multiple professions to do what we are trying to do–clinicians and technologists working together with different backgrounds solving common problems.”

Interview Link

 

Informatics Research Seminar: All About SILS (Research, Degrees, Faculty)

September 1 @ 4:00 – 5:00 pm

 

Speaker: Javed Mostafa, PhD
Presented from UNC-CH

Abstract:

One of the nation’s top-ranked schools of library and information studies  by U.S. News & World Report, SILS consistently takes a leadership role in today’s ever-changing information and library science landscape.

Mission
SILS educates innovative and responsible thinkers who will lead the information professions; discovers principles and impacts of information; creates systems, techniques, and policies to advance information processes and services; and advances information creation, access, use, management, and stewardship to improve the quality of life for diverse local, national, and global communities.

This mission is rooted in the values of our field, our university, and our school and seeks to achieve our vision as the leading information school in the world.  It has four components: education, basic research, design and development and real world engagement.  Our educational mission is manifested in our degree programs, in field studies and internships, and in the collaborative research our students do with faculty and other students.  Our basic research mission is rooted in the recognition that data, information, and knowledge are the engines of science, industry, and the human experience.  We study how information is created and flows among people and organizations, and how it is used and reused, managed, and preserved.  Our design and development mission manifests in interacting systems that include computational components (hardware and software), organizational components (indexes, metadata, ontologies), access components (user interfaces), and policy components. We develop and evaluate these interacting components in principled and systematic projects and investigations.   Our engagement mission is motivated by the recognition that information is socially embedded in culture and that real world problems are solved by people armed with knowledge of the past, contemporary information, and tools for exploration and decision making.  Engagement means not only leveraging information and tools beyond the campus, but also that protocols, practices, rights, and responsibilities be defined and defended and that people learn about them in context.

The School of Information and Library Science seeks to advance the profession and practice of librarianship and information science; to prepare students for careers in the field of information and library science; and to make significant contributions to the study of information. Faculty members further these goals by teaching and advisory work; by research and scholarly publishing; and by service to the school, the university, the state, and the professional community. The American Library Association (ALA) accredits both the master of science in library science degree and the master of science in information science degree.The Southern Association of Colleges and Schools accredits the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

SILS ALA Reaccreditation Program Presentation

SILS 2013 to 2020 Strategic Plan

The School of Information and Library Science (SILS) stands among the leading research-intensive schools devoted to educating information professionals. In the past two decades SILS and its peers have broadened research and educational missions beyond scholarly publishing and libraries to the entire spectrum of human information activities. This trend is manifested in what is characterized as the international i-School movement and SILS is an exemplar in demonstrating this 21st century view of information theory, practice, and education. This strategic plan benefits from the advances and challenges of the first decade of the new century and provides a foundation for the SILS of 2020 and beyond.

Biosketch:

Javed Mostafa is the Director of the Carolina Health Informatics Program and the Director of the Laboratory of Applied Informatics Research. His research concentrates on information retrieval problems, particularly related to search and user-system interactions in large-scale document/data repositories. He also serves as the Deputy Director of the Biomedical Informatics Core at the NC Translational & Clinical Sciences Institute and has current research engagements in biomedical data mining, analysis, visualization, user interface design, and multi-modal human-computer interaction. He regularly serves on program and organizing committees for major conferences and participates as reviewer for major grant initiatives.
Javed served as an associate editor for the ACM Transactions on Information Systems for eight years. He currently serves as editor-in-chief of the Journal of the Association for Information Science & Technology and he also serves as an associate editor of the ACM Transactions on Internet Technology.
Translating scientific advances into health care improvements is a passion for Javed, and based on support from UNC’s Translational & Clinical Sciences Institute, he co-founded a company concentrating on patient-centric decision support and streamlined care workflow called Keona Health. At UNC, Javed holds a joint faculty position in information science in the School of Information and Library Science and in the Biomedical Research Imaging Center in the School of Medicine. Additionally, he holds the title of Adjunct Professor of Community and Family Medicine, School of Medicine, Duke University.

Informatics Research Seminar: DEDUCE, Duke Enterprise Data Unified Content Explorer

January 21 @ 4:00 – 5:00 pm

 

Speaker: Jeffrey Ferranti, MD
Presented from Duke University

Abstract:

DEDUCE is a tool available to Duke faculty that enables the quantification of potential study subjects at Duke based on varying inclusion and exclusion criteria available in clinical records. It can be used to estimate potential recruitment.

Biosketch:

Jeffrey Ferranti, MD, MS, is chief information officer and vice president for medical informatics.

Ferranti is responsible for leading a team charged with the visioning, strategic planning, and effective adoption of integrated technology and information solutions that enable high-quality clinical care, research and education. He also serves as an informatics thought leader, both internal and external to Duke, and, in partnership with our wider medical community, develops an overarching informatics strategy in support of the Duke Health mission.

As the leader of Duke’s enterprise-wide Epic installation, he was responsible for deploying a single, seamless electronic health record across three hospitals and over 300 ambulatory clinics. Ferranti is passionate about leveraging advanced analytics to improve population health, implementing novel technologies to better partner with patients and promoting IT innovation to support new and emerging care models.

An active informatics researcher, Ferranti was the Duke principal investigator on two Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ)-funded research projects. The first aimed at developing a model pediatric electronic health record format, and the second evaluating the use of technology to detect and prevent adverse drug events across Duke University Health System. In addition, he ran an innovations project exploring the novel use of iPad and tablet technology in the pediatric critical care. He developed several innovative applications including the Duke Enterprise Data Unified Content Explorer (DEDUCE) and the Duke Integrated Subject Cohort Enrollment Research Network (DISCERN). Both of these projects aim to empower investigators with simple yet secure access to our enterprise data stores.

Ferranti holds a master’s degree in Biomedical Engineering and Medical Informatics from the Duke Pratt School of Engineering. He is a Six Sigma Master Black Belt and is actively involved in numerous patient safety and quality improvement projects across the health system. He is also a practicing neonatologist at Duke University Hospital.

 

Richesson Appointed DCHI Associate Director of Research

Richesson Appointed DCHI Associate Director of Research

Rachel Richesson, PhD, Associate Professor, Duke University School of Nursing, has been appointed Associate Director of Research at the Duke Center for Health Informatics (DCHI). She has a PhD and MS in Health Informatics and an MPH in Community Health Practice from the University of Texas.. She is a Fellow of the American College of Medical Informatics. She edited the first and only textbook on the topic of Clinical Research Informatics, published in 2012 (Springer). Director of the DCHI Ed Hammond, PhD, expressed his enthusiasm about Dr. Richesson joining the leadership  of DCHI: “We are so excited to include her as part of our leadership team, her expertise in informatics will be invaluable as we strive to promote research in the field .”

Dr. Richesson lectures on various topics related to data standards and interoperability for a number of programs at Duke. During her extensive research career, she has directed the identification and implementation of data standards for multi-national multi-site clinical research and epidemiological studies, including the NIH Rare Diseases Clinical Research Network (RDCRN), Type 1 Diabetes TrialNet, and The Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young (TEDDY) study.  She also helped to design and implement the RDCRN Contact Registry for over 150 rare diseases and supports various patient and disease advocacy organizations to develop patient registries for a number of other conditions.  Dr. Richesson served as co-chair the RDCRN Standards and Registry Committees, and has interacted with a number standards development organizations to represent the clinical research perspective. As part of her original informatics research, she has implemented and evaluated specific standardized coding systems (e.g., SNOMED CT, RxNorm and NDF-RT) in research settings and explored the coverage of these coding systems for various research projects. Further, she works with a number of multi-disciplinary teams to demonstrate how these and other data standards can be used to facilitate the analysis of large data sets to answer important population health questions.

Dr. Richesson currently leads the Phenotype & Data Quality Core for the NIH Health Systems Research Collaboratory, which is developing standards and quality metrics for clinical phenotyping using EHR data in pragmatic clinical trials. As part of the PCORnet Coordinating Center, she participated in developing and promoting standardized approaches for cohort identification using EHRs, including the development of “gold standard” definitions and measuring the predictive value of EHR query algorithms. She also co-led the PCORnet Rare Diseases Task Force with Dr. Priya Kishnani (Duke School of Medicine).

Dr. Richesson is the PI of NLM-funded research to develop a decision support readiness assessment model using specific data requirements for a number of clinical guidelines recommended for emergency medicine, and a co-investigator on a study aiming to improve patient outcomes for individuals with sickle cell diseases that includes the use of a national registry. She has served on a number of leadership roles at the American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA), including the Publications Task Force and the Clinical Research Informatics Working Group. She was Chair of the Scientific Program Committee for the 2014 Clinical Research Informatics Summit, and is on the planning committee for the 2016 AMIA Policy Invitational Summit and the American College of Informatics annual meeting in 2017. Currently, Dr. Richesson is co-chair of the AMIA HIT Standards Advisory Group with Dr. Christopher Chute (Johns Hopkins University).

In her role as Associate Director of Research for DCHI, Dr. Richesson will help promote biomedical informatics research at Duke by collaborating with DCHI on its interdisciplinary approach for education and research designed to bring together informaticians, physicians, nurses, and health care administrators with expertise in aggregation, analysis, and use of informatics to improve human health.

DeCart Data Science for the Health Science Summer Program, University of Utah

DeCart Data Science is a new  Health Science summer school program at the University of Utah beginning June 28, 2017 .

The program is a series of two and a half day courses including, rule-based NLP, machine learning NLP, data visualization, bioinformatics with Galaxy and predictive analytics. This will be a hands-on program using iPython notebooks.

For more information see, DeCART Data Science for the Health Science Summer Program, University of Utah

NEW Master’s (MS) Degree in Interdisciplinary Data Science (MIDS)

The Duke University Board of Trustees has approved a new MS Degree in Interdisciplinary Data Science for the Fall 2018.  Co-hosted by the Information Initiative at Duke (iiD) and the Social Science Research Institute (SSRI), the program will be train students from a variety of disciplines to be data scientists who are proficient in the management, security and communications of data as well as team-based sciences.  For more information, visit the Duke Today article.

Hammond Honored with Endowed Chair

“Building Bridges” is an apt term to describe the gift William Stead, MD and his wife, Janet, have recently made to endow a professorship at the Duke University School of Medicine to honor W. Ed Hammond, PhD, Professor of Community and Family Medicine and Director of the Duke Center for Health Informatics. The endowment is focused on “advancing knowledge by bridging disciplines.”  Dr. Stead, the chief strategy officer at Vanderbilt University Medical Center and a former Durham native, Duke Alumni and physician has been a colleague and friend of Dr. Hammond for forty years.  Together Drs. Hammond and Stead were integral in the creation of the field we now know of as Biomedical Informatics.